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Every electric car currently on sale in Ireland


Audi Q4 e-tron reviews

Audi Q4 e-tron

Maximum range between charges: 306-521km (WLTP)
Battery details: 51.5-77kWh lithium-ion (net capacity)
Motor details: 125kW single motor; 150kW single motor; 195kW dual-motor; 220kW dual-motor
Maximum power outputs: 170-299hp
Maximum torque outputs: 310-460Nm
Fastest recharging rates: 100-125kW
0-100km/h: 6.2-9.0 seconds
Energy consumption: 17.0-21.3kWh per 100km (WLTP)

The Audi Q4 e-tron is slightly hamstrung by sharing all of its underpinnings with the equally impressive, but cheaper, Volkswagen ID.4 and Skoda Enyaq. That said, in terms of premium electric cars, it's an outright star - bigger on the inside than most rivals (indeed, it's more spacious inside than an Audi Q5), stylish enough on the outside and reasonably good to drive. Plus, in price terms, it dramatically undercuts rivals such as the Mercedes EQA and Lexus UX 300e.

Read our Audi Q4 e-tron reviews


Audi e-tron 55 quattro SUV (2019)

Audi e-tron quattro

Maximum range between charges: 336-436km (WLTP)
Battery details: 71-95kWh lithium-ion
Motor details: 230-265kW twin-motor four-wheel-drive system (300kW on overboost)
Maximum power output: 312-360hp (402hp in overboost)
Maximum torque output: 540-561Nm (664Nm in overboost)
Fastest recharging rate: 150kW
0-100km/h: 6.6-6.8 seconds (5.7 seconds in overboost)
Energy consumption: 22.4-26.4kWh per 100km (WLTP)

Audi's e-tron quattro is a hugely satisfying electric car, with exceptional refinement and a high level of luxury about it. It's not exciting to drive, perhaps (well, the new S model aims to change that), but it is very pleasant. Looks good too. The newer e-tron '50' model is much more affordable, so long as you can live with less equipment, performance and range, while there's also the more rakish e-tron Sportback to consider.

Read our Audi e-tron reviews


Audi e-tron reviews

Audi e-tron GT

Maximum range between charges: 433-488km (WLTP)
Battery details: 84kWh lithium-ion (net capacity)
Motor details: 350-440kW dual-motor (390-475kW on boost)
Maximum power outputs: 475-598hp (530-632hp on boost)
Maximum torque outputs: 630-830Nm (640Nm on boost)
Fastest recharging rate: 270kW
0-100km/h: 3.3-4.5 seconds
Energy consumption: 19.9-22.5kWh per 100km (WLTP)

The Audi e-tron GT is arguably not just the most enjoyable-to-drive EV we've yet sampled, but equally might be the best new car that Audi has launched in ages. Low, sleek and sexy, it combines the usual Audi virtues of a high-quality cabin and all-wheel-drive security with a deftly-balanced chassis that belies the sheer weight of that massive battery pack. The RS version is scary fast. The downside? It's expensive and the (most basic, rear-wheel-drive) Porsche Taycan is actually slightly cheaper...

Read our Audi e-tron reviews


BMW i3s

BMW i3

Maximum range between charges: 270-310km (WLTP)
Battery details: 42.2kWh lithium-ion
Motor details: 125-135kW single rear-mounted motor
Maximum power output: 170hp (184hp for i3s)
Maximum torque output: 250Nm (270Nm for i3s)
Fastest recharging rate: 50kW
0-100km/h: 7.3 seconds (6.9 seconds for i3s)
Energy consumption: 13.1kWh per 100km (WLTP - 14.6kW/h for i3s)

BMW's quirky little i3 isn't everyone's cup of tea - that odd styling, the fact that it's strictly a four-seater, those weird rear-hinged doors - but six years on from its launch it's still a cracking EV, with swift performance, sharp(ish) handling and a gorgeous cabin. The i3s model is marginally faster, but not really worth the extra price or reduction in range.

Read our BMW i3 reviews


BMW i4

BMW i4

Maximum range between charges: 459-567km (WLTP)
Battery details: 74kWh lithium-ion (net capacity)
Motor details: 250kW single-motor, 400kW dual-motor
Maximum power outputs: 340-544hp
Maximum torque outputs: 430-795Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 200kW
0-100km/h: 3.9-5.7 seconds
Energy consumption: 22.1-25.8kWh per 100km (WLTP)

The all-electric version of BMW's new four-door 4 Series looks likely to give Tesla's Model 3 a bit of a bloody nose in the mid-size EV market. The standard i4 eDrive40 is priced quite close to the Model 3 Long Range and is competitive with the Californian car in most performance metrics. Will buyers love the BMW's mildly controversial styling? And will it be as sweet to drive as its petrol-engined siblings?

Read our BMW i4 review


BMW iX3 review

BMW iX3

Maximum range between charges: 459km (WLTP)
Battery details: 74kWh lithium-ion (net capacity)
Motor details: 210kW rear-mounted motor
Maximum power output: 286hp
Maximum torque output: 400Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 150kW
0-100km/h: 6.8 seconds
Energy consumption: 21.4kWh per 100km (WLTP)

Unlike Audi, BMW has decided to lead with an electric version of a car you can also buy as a petrol, diesel, or plug-in hybrid vehicle. The iX3 looks slightly smarter than the other versions (thanks to a lightly reprofiled grille and some neat detailing), although it's much the same inside. Electric range and performance are not ground-breaking, but it's a solid performer, and is rather more affordable than some rivals.

Read our BMW iX3 review


BMW iX

BMW iX

Maximum range between charges: 396-612km (WLTP)
Battery details: 71-105.2kWh lithium-ion (net capacity)
Motor details: 240-285kW dual-motor
Maximum power outputs: 326-523hp
Maximum torque outputs: 630-765Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 200kW
0-100km/h: 4.6-6.1 seconds
Energy consumption: 24.8-27.0kWh per 100km (WLTP)

The iX has courted controversy right from the get-go, thanks to that - ahem - challenging styling and a traditionalist-baiting promo film. However, it could well win buyers over with the extra-long range and rapid charging of the top-spec xDrive50 model, and being a BMW, it's pretty much guaranteed to be good to drive. Plus, if you're sitting inside it, you can't see the outside...

Read our BMW iX reviews


Citroen e-C4 review

Citroen e-C4

Maximum range between charges: 350km (WLTP)
Battery details: 45kWh lithium-ion (net capacity)
Motor details: 100kW motor
Maximum power output: 136hp
Maximum torque output: 260Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 100kW
0-100km/h: 9.7 seconds
Energy consumption: 17.2kWh per 100km (WLTP)

Citroen offers its C4 in petrol, diesel and fully electric forms, making use of the 50kWh battery and 100kW electric motor that we've seen in the Corsa, 208, Mokka and 2008. The nice thing about the e-C4 is that it doesn't drive like any of the other cars - it's softer on its long-travel suspension, and lighter in its steering, which makes it a very relaxing car to drive. Bonus: it's roomier than the e-2008 and Mokka-e and has a slightly better one-charge range.

Read our Citroen e-C4 review


DS 3 Crossback E-Tense

DS 3 Crossback E-Tense

Maximum range between charges: 320km (WLTP)
Battery details: 45kWh lithium-ion (net capacity)
Motor details: 100kW front-mounted motor
Maximum power output: 136hp
Maximum torque output: 260Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 100kW
0-100km/h: 9.0 seconds
Energy consumption: 17.5kWh per 100km (WLTP)

The luxurious DS brand has returned to Ireland this year, and it's packing all-electric power in the somewhat avant-garde shape of the DS 3 Crossback E-Tense. Essentially, under the skin, this uses exactly the same chassis and electric bits as the Peugeot e-2008, but wraps it all in an (arguably) more premium looking-and-feeling package. The DS 3 is actually pretty sweet to drive and has decent - if not exceptional - range and electric consumption. Worth the price premium over the Peugeot? That's probably down to whether you dress yourself in Brown Thomas or Dunnes...

Read our DS 3 Crossback E-Tense review


Honda e

Honda e

Maximum range between charges: 222km (WLTP)
Battery details: 35.5kWh lithium-ion
Motor details: 100-113kW single rear-mounted motor
Maximum power output: 136-154hp
Maximum torque output: 315Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 60kW
0-100km/h: 9.0-8.3 seconds
Energy consumption: 17.2kWh per 100km (WLTP)

The Honda e is a compact five-door supermini that's ideal for those sticking within urban confines. Don't let its cute styling fool you though, as underneath that simple design is a honed chassis that makes it quite an enjoyable car to drive, with a refined suspension setup and an amazingly tight turning circle. The impressive interior is packed with displays and is full of neat touches, too.

Read our Honda e reviews


Hyundai Ioniq

Hyundai Ioniq

Maximum range between charges: 311km (WLTP)
Battery details: 38.3kWh lithium-ion
Motor details: 100kW single front-mounted motor
Maximum power output: 136hp
Maximum torque output: 295Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 100kW
0-100km/h: 9.9 seconds
Energy consumption: n/a

Hyundai's Leaf rival gets an upgrade for 2020 with a larger battery and a slightly more powerful electric motor. Just like the outgoing model, though, it's a simple, sensible car with a roomy, comfy, interior and decent range - sufficient for the occasional long motorway journey. It may lack the wow factor of some other electric cars, but it's decently priced.

Read our Hyundai Ioniq reviews


Hyundai Kona Electric 64kWh

Hyundai Kona Electric

Maximum range between charges: 449km (WLTP)
Battery details: 64kWh lithium-ion
Motor details: 150kW single front-mounted motor
Maximum power output: 204hp
Maximum torque output: 395Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 100kW
0-100km/h: 7.6 seconds
Energy consumption: 14.3kWh per 100km (WLTP)

The electric Kona has been a smash hit in Ireland already, and is one of the prime drivers in the current spike in electric car sales. Not hard to see why, really - a trusted brand, a good-looking car, a massive battery with a long one-charge range (and a realistic one, too). The only fly in the ointment is the hefty price tag, but that doesn't seem to be putting many off.

Read our Hyundai Kona Electric review


Hyundai Ioniq 5 review

Hyundai Ioniq 5

Maximum range between charges: 481km (WLTP)
Battery details: 58-72.6kWh lithium-ion (net capacity)
Motor details: 160kW single-motor, 225kW dual-motor
Maximum power outputs: 217-305hp
Maximum torque outputs: 350-605Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 350kW
0-100km/h: 5.2-8.5 seconds
Energy consumption: 16.7-19.0kWh per 100km (WLTP)

Without question, the Hyundai Ioniq 5 is the most striking car the Korean firm has yet put on sale - it's SUV-sized, overall, but looks more like an overgrown hatchback, with deliberate overtones of the 1970s Hyundai Pony hatchback. Inside, it's spacious and airy, with fully reclining front seats in some models, has exceptional performance and range and tremendous quality. It's a little expensive, but that has been no barrier for Hyundai in recent years. A serious game-changer in the EV market, and there's more to come from the high-tech E-GMP platform that lies beneath...

Read our Hyundai Ioniq 5 review


Jaguar I-Pace EV400

Jaguar I-Pace

Maximum range between charges: 415-470km (WLTP)
Battery details: 90kWh lithium-ion
Motor details: 294kW twin motor four-wheel drive
Maximum power output: 400hp
Maximum torque output: 696Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 104kW
0-100km/h: 4.8 seconds
Energy consumption: 35.4-39.9kWh per 100km (WLTP)

Jag's gorgeous I-Pace was really the first EV to truly blow our minds. Aside from the looks, it has genuine sports car performance from its 400hp powertrain, and decent (if not quite as mind-blowing as we'd like) one-charge range. The interior is pretty lovely too, and the handling is excellent, once you allow for the chunky kerb weight.

Read our Jaguar I-Pace reviews


Kia e-Niro 64kWh (2019)

Kia e-Niro

Maximum range between charges: 312-450km (WLTP)
Battery details: 64kWh lithium-ion
Motor details: 100-150kW front-mounted motor
Maximum power output: 136-204hp
Maximum torque output: 295-395Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 77kW
0-100km/h: 7.8-9.9 seconds
Energy consumption: 15.8kWh per 100km (WLTP)

Kia's e-Niro comes in two flavours, with a lower-power, smaller-battery, cheaper-price model available. Most of the interest is in the more expensive 64kWh battery model though, and with real-world one-charge range of 420km it's not hard to see why. More conventional looking than the e-Soul, which should help its sales chances.

Read our Kia e-Niro review


Kia e-Soul (2019)

Kia e-Soul

Maximum range between charges: 312-450km (WLTP)
Battery details: 64kWh lithium-ion
Motor details: 100-150kW front-mounted motor
Maximum power output: 136-204hp
Maximum torque output: 295-395Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 77kW
0-100km/h: 7.8-9.9 seconds
Energy consumption: 15.8kWh per 100km (WLTP)

Kia's e-Soul is one of our favourite EVs right now, not least because it's so darned funky looking. Not everyone's cup of tea, but we think it's pretty cool. Cabin looks and feels classier than that of the e-Niro, and it's slightly cheaper than Hyundai's similarly-sized Kona. Quite good fun to drive, too.

Read our Kia e-Soul review


Lexus UX 300e review

Lexus UX 300e

Maximum range between charges: 315km (WLTP)
Battery details: 50kWh lithium-ion (net capacity)
Motor details: 150kW single motor
Maximum power outputs: 204hp
Maximum torque outputs: 300Nm
Fastest recharging rates: 50kW
0-100km/h: 7.5 seconds
Energy consumption: 16.8kWh per 100km (WLTP)

While the Lexus UX 300e was one of the first premium compact electric SUVs on the market, it has been swamped somewhat by newer entrants. Its one-charge range doesn't stand out, and neither is it cheap to buy, but it is a very high-quality product that focuses on comfort and refinement over apex-chasing cornering ability. It will no doubt prove to be a satisfying car to own, even if it isn't technically the best EV on sale.

Read our Lexus UX 300e


Mazda MX-30 reviews

Mazda MX-30

Maximum range between charges: 200km (WLTP)
Battery details: 30kWh lithium-ion (net capacity)
Motor details: 107kW single front-mounted motor
Maximum power output: 145hp
Maximum torque output: 271Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 50kW
0-100km/h: 9.7 seconds
Energy consumption: 19kWh/100km (WLTP)

The Mazda MX-30 is, in a word, quirky. It looks a bit like a crossover and it has odd rear-hinged back doors that barely make it any easier to get into the tiny rear seats. Best to think of it as a coupe-like vehicle. It’s not cheap to buy, either, and the range between charges is unimpressive. However, the interior quality is exceptional and it’s very smooth and comfortable to drive.

Read our Mazda MX-30 reviews


Mercedes EQA review

Mercedes-Benz EQA

Maximum range between charges: 419-429km (WLTP)
Battery details: 66.5kWh lithium-ion (net capacity)
Motor details: 140kW single-motor; 168kW dual-motor; 215kW dual-motor
Maximum power output: 190-292hp
Maximum torque output: 375-520Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 100kW
0-100km/h: 8.9-6.0 seconds
Energy consumption: 17.9-18.4kWh per 100km (WLTP)

An electrified GLA, the EQA impresses with a high-quality cabin and really very good electric consumption - even in mixed driving, with some motorway miles, we've managed to get 18.7kWh/100km out of the basic EQA 250. Doubtless the more powerful four-wheel-drive versions would be thirstier (so to speak). The EQA's downside is that it's only ordinary to drive, and rather expensive, especially compared to the roomier, longer-ranged Audi Q4 e-tron.

Read our Mercedes EQA review


2022 Mercedes EQB

Mercedes-Benz EQB

Maximum range between charges: 419km (WLTP)
Battery details: 66.5kWh lithium-ion (net capacity)
Motor details: 200kW dual motor
Maximum power output: 272hp
Maximum torque output: 520Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 100kW
0-100km/h: 6.5 seconds
Energy consumption: 15.9kWh per 100km (WLTP)

The EQB is basically a bigger version of the EQA, but just as with the comparison between the GLA and GLB, it's the bigger car that's arguably the more appealing model thanks to its bluffer, squarer shape that does a better impression of being a miniaturised G-Wagen. Like the GLB, the EQB is a seven-seater, so it's more practical than an EQA, and gets a bigger battery and four-wheel drive as standard (although the extra size and weight means it has no more range than the EQA).


Mercedes-Benz EQC 400 4Matic (2019)

Mercedes-Benz EQC

Maximum range between charges: 417km (WLTP)
Battery details: 80kWh lithium-ion
Motor details: 300kW twin-motor four-wheel drive
Maximum power output: 408hp
Maximum torque output: 760Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 112kW
0-100km/h: 5.1 seconds
Energy consumption: 19.7-20.8kWh/100km (WLTP)

Merc's EQC is both new and old - new battery, new electric motors, but mounted to an old(ish) GLC platform. That brings compromises in terms of packaging and weight, but in spite of a smaller battery than most of the competition, it's quick to drive. Lovely interior, but a touch cramped.

Read our Mercedes-Benz EQC review


2021 Mercedes EQV

Mercedes-Benz EQV

Maximum range between charges: 361km (WLTP)
Battery details: 90kWh lithium-ion (net capacity)
Motor details: 150kW motor
Maximum power output: 204hp
Maximum torque output: 300Nm (366Nm on boost)
Fastest recharging rate: 110kW
0-100km/h: 12.1 seconds
Energy consumption: 26.3-26.4kWh per 100km (WLTP)

The Mercedes-Benz EQV is both massive (it comes with seats for up to eight people and two wheelbase options) and massively expensive (we're into six figures here, once you add some options), but it's one of the most compelling electric cars we've yet driven. No, it's not really for private buyers - it's more for eco-friendly airport taxi firms - but it's still great with its high-up driving position, electric side doors and masses of space. Not the longest range around, but it's sufficient and the build quality is excellent.


MINI Electric (2020)

MINI Electric

Maximum range between charges: 235-270km (WLTP)
Battery details: 32.6kWh lithium-ion
Motor details: 135kW single front-mounted motor
Maximum power output: 184hp
Maximum torque output: 270Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 50kW DC
0-100km/h: 7.3 seconds
Energy consumption: 15.5-18kWh/100km (WLTP)

The electric MINI has been a long time coming (prototypes were first built a decade ago), but it seems worth the wait, with the usual cheeky styling (love those alloy wheels) and the usual MINI handling. It's quite short on range, though, so may struggle against some rivals.

Read our MINI Electric review


Nissan Leaf 40kWh

Nissan Leaf

Maximum range between charges: 270-385km (WLTP)
Battery details: 40-62kWh lithium-ion
Motor details: 100-159kW single front-mounted motor
Maximum power output: 150-217hp
Maximum torque output: 320-340Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 100kW
0-100km/h: 6.9-7.9 seconds
Energy consumption: 16.3-20kWh/100km (WLTP)

Nissan's big-selling Leaf does an excellent job of making electric motoring look and feel totally normal. Slightly disappointing range of the basic 40kWh model made up for by the newer (and much more expensive) 62kWh version. Interior a bit dull, and so is the chassis, but it's roomy and quite good looking.

Read our Nissan Leaf reviews


Opel Corsa-e review

Opel Corsa-e

Maximum range between charges: 337km (WLTP)
Battery details: 45kWh lithium-ion (net capacity)
Motor details: 100kW motor
Maximum power output: 136hp
Maximum torque output: 260Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 100kW
0-100km/h: 8.1 seconds
Energy consumption: 15.9kWh per 100km (WLTP)

You could argue that the Corsa-e isn't as sharp-looking as more recent Opels, such as the mechanically identical Mokka-e and the all-new Astra hatchback. That said, it's still quietly smart looking and if the cabin is a bit plain (and it really, really is...) then at least it's well-made and comfortable. Bonus points for proper physical air conditioning controls instead of the fiddly touchscreen setup found in its sister car, the Peugeot e-208. The Corsa's one-charge range is sufficient for long intercity journeys and, with 100kW charging, it tops back up again quickly on the public network. The electric equivalent of sensible shoes, but there's nothing wrong with that.

Read our Opel Corsa-e review


2020 Peugeot e-208

Peugeot e-208

Maximum range between charges: 340km (WLTP)
Battery details: 50kWh lithium-ion
Motor details: 100kW single front-mounted motor
Maximum power output: 136hp
Maximum torque output: 260Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 100kW DC
0-100km/h: 8.1 seconds
Energy consumption: 15kWh/100km (WLTP)

Peugeot's electric e-208 doesn't shout about its battery status with its styling, but then the regular 208 is so striking to look at that it doesn't really need to. Peppy performance combines with a high-quality cabin and a capable chassis. Price is decent, too.

Read our Peugeot e-208 review


Peugeot e-2008 review

Peugeot e-2008

Maximum range between charges: 322km (WLTP)
Battery details: 45kWh lithium-ion (net capacity)
Motor details: 100kW motor
Maximum power output: 136hp
Maximum torque output: 260Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 100kW
0-100km/h: 8.7 seconds
Energy consumption: 13.4kWh per 100km (WLTP)

Yet another car from the vast Stellantis car-making group that uses the e-CMP chassis, the 50kWh battery and the 136hp electric motor. As with its close cousins, the Opel Mokka-e, Citroen e-C4 and DS 3 Crossback e-Tense, the e-2008 makes for a very impressive electric crossover. It's probably the best-looking car of the group, has a stylish, reasonably roomy interior, is well-made and engaging to drive. The only problem is that its range feels a little on the short side once you've driven the Citroen e-C4.

Read our Peugeot e-2008 review


Porsche Taycan

Porsche Taycan

Maximum range between charges: 462km (WLTP)
Battery details: 79.2-93.4kWh lithium-ion
Motor details: one on each axle with 320-560kW
Maximum power output: 761hp
Maximum torque output: 1,050Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 270kW DC
0-100km/h: as low as 2.8 seconds
Energy consumption: 21.1-24.5kWh/100km (WLTP)

The Porsche Taycan is, arguably, one of the company's most important products ever, as it makes the transition from being a producer of emotive sports cars (and SUVs of course) powered by internal combustion to one powered solely by electricity. It's an astounding creation, though not cheap to buy.

Read our Porsche Taycan reviews


Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo review

Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo

Maximum range between charges:419-456km (WLTP)
Battery details: 83.7kWh lithium-ion (net capacity)
Motor details: 350-560kW dual-motor
Maximum power outputs: 476-762hp
Maximum torque outputs: 500-1,050Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 270kW
0-100km/h: 2.9-5.1 seconds
Energy consumption: 22.4-24.4kWh per 100km (WLTP)

The Porsche Taycan, with its quality, its handling and its insane performance (certainly that of the Turbo S model) makes it one of the best cars (not just electric cars) that you can buy. There's just one drawback - you can't put a dog in the back. Well, the Taycan Cross Turismo is here to fix that problem, with its practical estate-slash-SUV back end for extra practicality. It's also a tiny bit higher off the ground than a standard Taycan, if you need some rough-road capability. In all other respects, it's just as brilliantly bonkers as the standard version.

Read our Porsche Taycan Turbo Cross Turismo review


Renault Zoe R135 Z.E.50 (2020)

Renault Zoe

Maximum range between charges: 386-395km (WLTP)
Battery details: 52kWh lithium-ion
Motor details: 80-100kW single front-mounted motor
Maximum power output: 108-135hp
Maximum torque output: 225-245Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 50kW
0-100km/h: 9.5-11.4 seconds
Energy consumption: TBA

Renault's Zoe got a massive update for 2020, with a bigger battery, longer range and the option of a rapid 135hp motor. It looks a little sharper too, and the cabin feels like a more high-quality item. Pricing is pretty sharp, so expect this to do big business, especially with that near-400km range.

Read our Renault Zoe reviews


Renault Twizy

Renault Twizy

Maximum range between charges: 60km (WLTP)
Battery details: 6.1kWh lithium-ion
Motor details: 13kW single rear-mounted motor
Maximum power output: 17hp
Maximum torque output: 57Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 7.4kW
0-100km/h: n/a
Energy consumption: n/a

Renault's Twizy is among the maddest cars we've driven (if it actually is a car). No Ferrari draws as many looks nor smiles from the pavement, but for god's sake don't try and take it on the motorway. Limited in every performance metric, but crazy fun in the right circumstances. Doors optional.

Read our Renault Twizy review


Skoda Enyaq iV reviews

Skoda Enyaq iV

Maximum range between charges: 390-510km (WLTP)
Battery details: 58-77kWh lithium-ion (net capacity)
Motor details: 132kW single-motor; 150kW single-motor; 192kW dual-motor
Maximum power outputs: 146-257hp
Maximum torque outputs: 310-425Nm
Fastest recharging rates: 100-125kW
0-100km/h: 6.9-8.9 seconds
Energy consumption: 15.0-21.6kWh per 100km (WLTP)

Is the Skoda Enyaq the best all-round electric car currently on sale? There's a solid argument to be made that it is - it's (arguably) better looking, inside and out than the mechanically identical Volkswagen ID.4, and yet is slightly more affordable, model-for-model. It's massive inside, and hugely comfortable even on the sort of long journeys that its 510km range allows you to undertake. The boot is just huge, too, which is good if you've got a growing family. It's heavy but is surprisingly responsive to drive. A four-wheel-drive 80x version arrives soon, and a sporty RS model is on the way too.

Read our Skoda Enyaq iV reviews


Tesla Model 3

Tesla Model 3

Maximum range between charges: 409-560km (WLTP)
Battery details: 54-75kWh lithium-ion
Motor details: 211kW single rear-mounted motor or 307-353kW dual-motor four-wheel drive
Maximum power output: 283-473hp
Maximum torque output: 510-639Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 250kW Supercharger
0-100km/h: 3.4-5.6 seconds
Energy consumption: 16-18kWh/100km (WLTP)

Tesla's new, hugely anticipated Model 3 has begun Irish deliveries. Can it live up to the massive hype? Pretty much, yeah. As ever with Tesla, it's a work in progress, but performance, range and overall quality are good. It's great to drive, too.

Read our Tesla Model 3 review


Tesla Model S 100D Long Range (2019)

Tesla Model S

Maximum range between charges: 590-610km (WLTP)
Battery details: 100kWh lithium-ion
Motor details: 311-451kW dual-motor four-wheel drive
Maximum power output: 417-605hp
Maximum torque output: 660-931Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 250kW Supercharger
0-100km/h: 3.8-2.6 seconds
Energy consumption: 21-22kWh/100km (WLTP)

Tesla's Model S has been around a while now, but its performance goes from strength to strength. Has a long enough range to consign range anxiety to the bin in all but the most extreme circumstances. Insane (ludicrous, even) performance, but build quality still a bit variable.

Read our Tesla Model S reviews


Tesla Model X 90D

Tesla Model X

Maximum range between charges: 485-505km (WLTP)
Battery details: 100kWh lithium-ion
Motor details: 311-451kW dual-motor four-wheel drive
Maximum power output: 417-611hp
Maximum torque output: 660-931Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 250kW Supercharger
0-100km/h: 4.6-2.9 seconds
Energy consumption: 24kWh/100km (WLTP)

Tesla's Model X, with its wild 'Falcon' doors, can still draw a crowd at the kerbside, and rightly so. It pulls a big advantage out over similarly-priced electric SUV rivals by being available with five, six, or seven seats, and it's faster than most of them too. If only the quality was better, and the handling too.

Read our Tesla Model X reviews


Volkswagen ID.3

Volkswagen ID.3

Maximum range between charges: 410-424km (WLTP)
Battery details: 58kWh lithium-ion
Motor details: 150kW single rear-mounted motor
Maximum power output: 204hp
Maximum torque output: 310Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 100kW
0-100km/h: 7.3 seconds
Energy consumption: 15.5-16.9kWh/100km (WLTP)

The ID.3 is one of the most-hyped electric cars of the moment, mostly because it comes from the behemoth that is Volkswagen. It's good-looking, very spacious for its size and has a decent range. The initial '1st Edition' models are really well-equipped and not badly priced, either.

Read our VW ID.3 review


Volkswagen ID.4 review

Volkswagen ID.4

Maximum range between charges: 343-517km (WLTP)
Battery details: 58-77kWh lithium-ion (net capacity)
Motor details: 109kW single-motor; 150kW dual-motor; 220kW dual-motor
Maximum power outputs: 148-299hp
Maximum torque outputs: 220-472Nm
Fastest recharging rates: 100-125kW
0-100km/h: 6.2-10.9 seconds
Energy consumption: 15.9-18.8kWh per 100km (WLTP)

The ID.4 is a big seller for Volkswagen in Ireland, and it's not hard to see why. You get all of the EV goodness that you'll find in the smaller ID.3, but with a bigger battery and more range as standard in most models, and all of that for only a few Euro more per month on a PCP deal. Plus, the ID.4's interior is not only more spacious, but also looks and feels better built than that of the ID.3. It's good to drive too, and efficient in the way it uses its power. The only glitch? The Skoda Enyaq that's peering over its shoulder...

Read our Volkswagen ID.4 review


Volvo XC40 Recharge

Volvo XC40 Recharge

Maximum range between charges: 400-418km (WLTP)
Battery details: 75kWh lithium-ion (net capacity)
Motor details: 300kW dual-motor
Maximum power output: 408hp
Maximum torque output: 660Nm
Fastest recharging rate: 150kW
0-100km/h: 4.9 seconds
Energy consumption: 28.5kWh per 100km (WLTP)

There's a lot to like about the all-electric XC40, not least its shockingly fast (pun intended) performance. In fact, with a sub-five-second 0-100km/h dash, it feels at times more like a BMW M car than a traditional Volvo. The downside to that is quite hefty power consumption, which keeps the range relatively short, at a time when many rivals are stretching to more than 500km on a charge. The cabin is typically Volvo - very well made and with superb comfort - and the new Google Android-based infotainment system is clever, if a touch fiddly at first. More affordable single-motor version coming soon, as is the sleeker looking C40 Recharge.