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SEAT Ireland donates vehicles to the Mater Hospital

SEAT Ireland donates vehicles to the Mater Hospital
SEAT Ireland donates vehicles to the Mater Hospital
SEAT Ireland donates vehicles to the Mater Hospital
SEAT Ireland donates vehicles to the Mater Hospital

SEAT Alhambra MPVs join the Mater’s fleet of SEAT scooters.

SEAT, which had already donated a fleet of electric KickScooters to the Mater Hospital has followed that up with a donation of Alhambra MPVs.

MPVs to be used for patient transport

The Alhambra MPVs are supposed to help hospital staff in the transportation of patients and will reduce the hospital's dependency on taxi services. For the most part, the Alhambras will be used to transport discharged patients home, safely. They can also be used by Mater staff who want to get about with taking the risk of getting an infection from public transport.

Tireless work

Commenting on the announcement, Niall Phillips, Brand Director at SEAT Ireland said: "We are happy to be able to assist The Mater Hospital with the use of these eXS KickScooters and vehicles and hope this gesture will benefit both hospital staff and patients. Speaking on behalf of everyone at SEAT Ireland, I would like to thank them for their tireless work in keeping us all safe during these unprecedented circumstances."

Alan Sharp, CEO of Mater Hospital added: "SEAT Ireland has shown incredible support to the Mater Hospital in helping us meet the COVID-19 challenges. The scooters are benefitting staff who normally use public transport and the cars will facilitate the safe and socially distanced transfer of patients to and from the hospital. We would like to thank SEAT Ireland for their support and partnering with the hospital to make a difference."

Production restarts in Barcelona

The donation comes as SEAT has restarted normal vehicle production at its factory in Barcelona, using methods including temperature checks and the wearing of face-masks. The plant is currently working at one-third capacity, so as to make it easier to keep employees at a safe distance from one another. The company had switched the Leon production line to making ventilators for Spanish hospitals, and had made 600 of them, but is now winding down production due to the decreased pressure on hospital intensive care units.


Published on April 30, 2020
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